Electric Vehicles and the Environmental Impact Net Effect

As divided as the world appears to be on topics such as the environmental impact of oil and other fossil fuels, I think a shift towards green sources of energy is inevitable. If it’s not a matter of what we’re doing to our only home environment, then it’s a matter that hits us where it matters most, which is in our pockets. The big oil companies have the capital resources to invest in cleaner sources of energy and in some way they’re being forced to jump on board, such as how some of their biggest clients in the motor manufacturing industry are increasingly using hybrid engines.

Speaking of cars, Dayinsure, which is one of the UK’s leading short-term car insurance firms, commissioned a survey of UK driving opinions. Different questions were asked, one very interesting one is that of whether or not hands-free kits should be illegal. You would think that it’s a straight-forward question, or rather one which is overly simplistic, but when you consider the stats associated with the safety surrounding the use of hands-free kits in comparison to using handheld devices, some interesting perspectives around the debate develop.

It very quickly gets established that things aren’t quite what they seem…

The same can be said of the question which asks if non-electric cars should be made illegal and I guess this is more in line with the main topic of this particular post.

If anything, this provokes a healthy debate which has us looking into the net effect of the intended laws which we are to progress around environmental affairs. 25% of the people who took the survey think non-electric cars should me made illegal.

This means that 75% oppose this move, but does that mean these people don’t care for the environment, or that they’re perhaps part of the lucrative global fossil fuels market?

Probably not… And here’s why:

I’m probably one of the staunchest supporters of the environmentalism movement, right? However, I think the net effect of our efforts to conserve the environment should be taken into account. Look, the UK already plans to ban a sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles by 2040, which makes for a strong statement as far as the UK Government’s efforts in forcing environmental reform.

However, in thinking about this mentioned net effect, it becomes a matter of asking ourselves the critical question of where the energy to power what would be fully electric vehicles would come from. This is how we take into account the net effect.

I mean it doesn’t help if you’ll be charging up at a charging station whose stored power supply is generated in the traditional ways that have been identified to be bad for the environment, such as using fossil fuels like coal.

I think if we’re going to go electric as a means through which to focus more on cleaner energy, we’ll have to go fully renewable, even with the original sources which power up the charging stations all our electric vehicles will be charging up at.

A guide to ditching plastics in 2020

It’s time to get serious about reducing our plastic use. According to scientists our oceans will be so polluted with plastics by 2050, that there will be more plastics than fish in our oceans. Over eight million bits of plastic and microplastics are released into the ocean every day across the globe. It is clearly time to take action. Making small changes to your lifestyle can make a huge difference and it’s easy to get started. Where The Trade Buys, who specialise in case bound book printing, share their expertise on how you can ditch plastics for good in 2020.

  • Ditch the plastic bags and straws

Luckily, these items are becoming less commonplace in the UK today. However, it can still be difficult to avoid them at times. When you pick up a takeaway for example, don’t be afraid to say no to the excess plastic bags your food is wrapped in. If you’re serious about making environmentally-friendly changes in your life to benefit the planet, the advice and guidance found on this website is a great place to begin – https://www.ecokarma.net/.

  • Make the switch to reusable water bottles and coffee cups

Takeaway coffee cups are a major source of waste material and plastic bottles take a shocking 450 years to decompose. With this in mind, it is more pressing than every to make the switch to reusable items. KeepCups and Chilly’s Bottles are popular brands that focus on sustainable products.

  • Choose ‘zero waste’ shops

Thankfully, zero waste shops are becoming far more common in the UK. The idea of zero waste shops is that they sell produce with absolutely no plastic packaging. Switching up your shopping routine and choosing a zero-waste shop would be a great habit to get into in 2020. You can find a list of zero waste shops and where to find them here.

  • Opt for a bamboo toothbrush

Plastic toothbrushes take 400 years to decompose, and if you consider how many you go through in a lifetime, the life span of them all is shocking. A bamboo toothbrush on the other hand, only takes five to ten years – minimal in comparison!

  • Use beeswax instead of clingfilm

Sustainable food storage is another factor that people often forget to consider. We throw away single use clingfilm without a second thought, because it seems like such a necessity within our lives. Now however, there are plenty of alternatives to use if you want to go plastic free. Beeswrap, for example, is a ‘natural alternative to plastic wrap’ which can be used time and time again.

  • Ditch plastic bottles in favour of soap bars

Shampoo and hand soap always seem to come with excess plastic packaging. There is simply no need to coat these items in plastic, as they work perfectly well in bar form. This is another tiny switch that will make little difference to your daily routine but really help out the environment. 

  • Use a refill station for washing up liquid and detergents

Instead of chucking out the plastic bottle when your washing up liquid runs out, hold on to it and get it refilled! Lots of sustainable shops now offer this service, making it easier than ever to opt for refills rather than wasting more plastic.

  • Shop and spend less

This last one is essential, although perhaps not as easy as the other lifestyle changes. Every time you buy something, especially online, it is likely to come swaddled in needless layers of plastic. If you cut down on this spending, you could make a real environmental change. Maybe get eco-friendly bedding too!

  • Switch to sustainable Tupperware

Along the same theme, consider switching to sustainable Tupperware. There are plenty of alternatives to wasteful plastic Tupperware, such as bamboo, glass, or stainless-steel alternatives. Oxfam do a great range!

  • Buy your fruit and veg unpackaged or grow your own

Many supermarkets are now making switch to packaging free products. If you have the option, choose to load up brown paper bags with fruit and vegetables rather than choosing pre-package food.   Alternatively, you could grow your own veg in a greenhouse or allotment. It’s easy to take the first steps towards reducing your plastic use. They will soon become second nature! If everyone chips in and makes an effort towards sustainability, we will see a reduced amount of plastic pollution our oceans.